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Friday, November 17, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: The 100 Rules of Money : by Richard Templar - できる人のお金の増やし方: (100のお金のルール) リチャード・テンプラー

This great international best seller is focused on "how to have a millionaire mindset". Imagine if George Soros or Richard Branson gave you financial advice as a personal mentor. Would they know patterns or behaviours that could help teach you to grow wealthy? My guess is yes, most likely. Happily, this is just one of over 8 books in the "Rule series" of international best selling books by the author.

The author Richard Templar, does a very splendid job of explaining his 100 rules for making more money and building personal wealth. It will help any person to be in the right mental mindset. It will help you see clear income opportunities, understand them, and finally benefit from them financially. It is indeed a process. It may be unsaid, but it is clearly there.  

The entire list of lessons vary in importance, but many are outstanding, and really stand out. These 100 rules act as a wealth coach for anybody wanting to become more financially independent. Personal favorites include the ones that focus on how to control your emotions and personal spending habits as income grows. Wealth is not often helpful if not properly prepared for. If you fail to plan for higher wealth, your wealth once in place may cause you to fail. 

Wealth should be a friend not an enemy (rule 8) explains how unexpected large money decisions can be stressful without answers or action at the ready. Understanding the true relationship between money and happiness (rule 14) is not an easy one. Neither is the related wisdom on how money, if only is seen as a solution, can often become the problem (rule 11).

The most difficult lessons involve discipline. It is harder to manage yourself than to manage your money (rule 18). Knowing where you are and having a clear plan (rule 19 & 20) and deciding your risk appetite (rule 24) are not easy decisions. In fact, your risk appetite can change over time along with your life cycle circumstances. You have to work hard early in order to make enough wealth to not work hard later (rule 29). 

The most basic rule is spend less than you earn (rule 36). The many get rich quick schemes are also to be avoided (rule 60) while borrowing money from friends (rule 86) gives a lot of insight into how to deal with such situations. With children, allowing kids to know about poverty as a motivator (rule 95), does have a productive benefit. It is not really best to shelter them from it always. Having direct participation with volunteering experiences and meeting the homeless or poor who are directly helped by these volunteering efforts can help change for the better, the kids who help when they are young and able to best understand the full impact of their actions in any community service.


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) Surprisingly, these very time tested lessons are not difficult to understand, they are just difficult to follow long term for most who read them.
2) Motivation seems to be a very strong motivator for many actions needed long term to achieve wealth goals. The higher the motivation, the longer the time possible to achieve any goals.
3) Boot strapping startups with your own funds is fine, but when you also borrow funds from friends & family it can be negative. Too often, those same friends and family need to be paid back earlier than possible and then there is permanent friction with those relationships long term,

No matter what your income level, business owner or new employee, these 100 rules of money are all worth reviewing. It all helps in trying to build any future career and wealth plan. All of these rules are reasonable and need to be answered by each person individually. This is important in order to build a solid foundation for any person's financial wealth plan, no matter what the starting size. Highly Recommended!

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, November 10, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: Laughing at Wall Street (with 2800% stock returns!) by Chris Camillo ウォール街で笑います (2800%の株式リターン!) クリスカミッロ

The world of finance can be scary for some, and this book tries to erase that impression. The author Chris Camillo shows in his online trading statement between September 2007 and April 2010, He proves that professionals are not always needed. He turned his US$83,752 trading account into US$2,388,311 in under 3 years. That is a 28 fold increase on his capital! Every investor's dreamed about bottom line. Clearly, Bitcoin like dream results can exist with simple stocks too.

Results matter, and readers find out what basic observation methods he uses to make such amazing trading returns. This is not a highly skilled day trader with a cutting edge algo program. This is just an amature investor who pays attention to the consumer trends around him, and connects the dots to make big money returns. 

It all seems so simple, but the genius is in learning to recognize the patterns. We learn that he tried the usual route of following analysts on CNBC, Bloomberg or other media. He followed buy and sell reports of various analysts, but then changed. He learned to follow his own advice on insights to see the big trade early, before the analysts had it on any radar.

To be clear, the author is not usual, he is sharp and his personality is always on a hunt for market value. We learn that he enjoyed recycle markets, yards sales, tag sales, garage sales or whatever term you may use. He would get up early, and often notice that women were often in charge of pricing various items. Dolls, clothes and home items were often well priced, but male themed items often had a wider price range, an opportunity for a better price! 

So how does a man going off to yard sales make real money in markets? One single style, observation of the world around you. He often liked to drink ice tea, and Snapple was his favorite brand. At the time the brand was everywhere, and easy to find. One day he noticed that the shelf space at his local convenience store was no longer as wide in selection for his favorite beverage. In fact, it was only 20% of what it was before the change in shelf space. 

Could this be a sign of a peak in the Snapple brand's popularity? The stock price was still high, so he checked at various stores, all the same.  Less shelf space meant less sales, so earnings would disappoint, so he put on a short. That is the process on how he discovered his trades and made a killing. Always use information that you discover before the market. That simple action as a clear early mover is often an advantage. When you go to any store regularly, ask yourself "what has changed in selection?" Does this mean there could be an opportunity in a single stock?

The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:


1) Surprisingly, there is a process that any individual can learn that will give an investor a personal edge. It comes down to observation not luck or insider information.

2) Like the Matrix movie series, you can see the world as it hopes, and rely on experts to pay financial fees to forever. Alternatively, you can see for yourself, and avoid paying fees forever after.

3) Social Media, Shopping Malls, local neighborhoods all contain the core basics of human behaviour. When you learn how to see, you can see market opportunities all around you everyday.

We learn about various other trades with a similar theme. Keep your eyes open and notice what people buy and sell, or throw away. Check out what is in your neighbour's garbage. It could give real market insight into what is popular now or is no longer. That informational mindset is what the author does a great job at explaining. Very well explained, and very easy to replicate with any product or service today or tomorrow. This is not a stock picking strategy that will be obsolete in a short time. You learn how to open your eyes and really see trading opportunities all around you. It can be a very profitable way of life. It can work long term, so it is Highly Recommended!

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, November 3, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: Jardine Matheson, Traders of the Far East: Robert Blake ジャーディンマセソン, 極東のトレーダーたち:ロバート・ブレイク

A long time ago I read, "When Jardine Matheson does well, Hong Kong does well". This was a quote from over 100 years ago. What kind of legendary trading firm was this? I had no idea until I went to Hong Kong, for the first time in 1989. I saw its dominant head office building with its famous round windows. Impressive for sure as I grew up reading James Clavell's Taipan, Noble House, even Shogun. To later learn that Jardine Matheson, was the original inspiration for these great stories attracted me instantly. I kept on reading into it and digging for more.

This book is in fact, a history of the firm over time. It covers the origins(started in 1832 officially), its growth story, and historical background(first visit to Canton, China in 1802). It explains how after almost 200 years, it still thrives in the economies of Hong Kong and beyond. China trade with the UK really began with the importation of tea from China, but it was so popular, silver became scarce in the treasury of the UK. Another trade had to be found to help the imbalance and the first to fill this gap was opium. Due to the British Empire, India had great farms of opium at its disposal. This could be the perfect source to trade with China for the highly valued tea, and not deplete the UK treasury. 

Great trading houses were formed at the time, and Jardine Matheson, became one of the most dominant of all time. Opium was a morally difficult good, but did the job, so had to be considered a means to an end. When looking back at the trading volume into China over those early years, over 95% of trade was due to opium, not much else really mattered in global UK trade. By the 1880s, competition by many smaller rivals and the steamship made the business less profitable. It was then that a wide expansion took place across many new businesses now run actively today.


In the present day, Jardine Matheson runs many diverse businesses with over 50,000 employees around the world in  many countries generating over US$42 Billion in revenue annually. To say that this huge company has grown and been successful, is real classic British understatement. Hongkong Land was started in 1889, and is a key property developer that was an early spin off business for the group. It now runs over 5 million square feet of land (450,000 sqm) in the Central business and shopping district. Sir Paul Chater was the original founder in the business, along with William Keswick, a later Taipan. Chater House, Chater Road and many other buildings in the Central district of Hong Kong were named after him and are still used today. Within property, the Mandarin Hotel opened in Hong Kong as the first 5 star hotel in 1961 is also a key success for the company. Insurance, automotive, dairy and many other additional industries have all sprouted and flourished from this core company over time.


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) Surprisingly, both William Jardine and James Matheson did not spend much of their lives in Asia or Hong Kong. They made their mark there, but both soon moved back to the UK, and grew the company from there.

2) The firm was a pioneer for trading and helped establish Hong Kong itself. However Dent & Company and later John Swire & Butterfield were fierce trading rivals at the time. Drama in business dealings of dubious natures was never in short supply.

3) The International Treaty of Nanking, and the two Opium wars left China in defeat. It left the UK with a strong Asian foothold in Hong Kong & Kowloon. All of these events were fully supported by the local head of Jardines, the "Taipan" as he was locally known.

It is curious to note that the Scottish roots to many of the top UK trading firms also influenced Japan. Jardines and Swires certainly are current today, but competitors have risen. Japanese trading houses like Marubeni, Itochu, Mitsui and of course Mitsubishi Trading all had strong Scottish influences during their global transformations. Mitsubishi Trading was driven in large part by the Scottish Samurai, Thomas Blake Glover. He originally joined Jardine Matheson in 1857 and went to Shanghai, China. He then went on to Nagasaki, Japan in 1859. After establishing Jardine Matheson in Japan, he went on to help Mitsubishi. His actions created JR Trains, Kirin Beer, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. He helped the founder of Mitsubishi group Yataro Iwasaki begin the company along with his brother Yanosuke Iwasaki, and all three were lifelong friends. Glover was in fact, the same person used as inspiration for Madame Butterfly. Glover was also the inspiration for James McFay, the core character of Gai-Jin by James Clavell. This book is highly recommended and very easy to read. It can be a bit dry in parts, so better taken in spurts for a few hours over a weekend or on a commute.

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, October 27, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: Lucky or Smart? by Bo Peabody (Start Up CEO) セレンディピティ―幸運を生むタマゴ: ボーピーボディ(ITスタートアップ)

Fortunes come and go in business, it is just a fact. Which entrepreneurs kept their money after the first IT boom? Who now in the FinTech & Social Media boom is still alive, and  doing well today? Were these first wave internet founders just lucky? or were they smart to make the money they did? Will FinTech or Social Media entrepreneurs follow the same pattern in future? This book answers this well, and goes well beyond. If you want to know what kind of personality it takes to be an Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates, this will make it clear.

Bo Peabody started a company in 1994 with a wonderful bunch of "odd people". This was before many had even heard of "the internet". He sold Tripod in 1998 for US$58M which later became Terra Lycos. He was not able to sell his stock lock up for 2 years, which allowed the position to increase 10 FOLD. Was he lucky or smart? Clearly both is what you learn about him, a very keen balance between the two.

This is not a book about "why I am not a genius". It is more a very well-balanced account of what parts of his decisions were smart and which were lucky. The smart part of many of Bo's decisions were about when to realize that he gets some luck, and then stays out of its way. I like reading about how lucky people can be and recognize it. I too often meet people who find themselves lucky and feel it is mainly because of their own talent. That is just not the same attitude. He does not claim to be a genius, and you never get that message in any of the chapters.

He calls himself a "B-student" as does his mother, but he has straight A insight on more than one occasion. He also makes a great distinction about how B student types are often better overall business founders, while A students make better focused managers in those businesses that are founded. This recognition is not easy to make, and proves to me how smart he really was. That is not a widely known lesson for many.

He has since gone on to start a restaurant business, a venture capital firm, and continues to invest in other start ups. He knows the bigger picture, and knows what drives the results needed in a bigger picture result. He is a lot smarter than he leads us to believe in the first chapter. The more you learn, the more you realize, that perseverance is never easy and costs a lot in time and energy. There are no short cuts, and you learn that without doubt. He even learns how to "cry" in order to deal with employee problems. 

This easy to absorb book reminds any reader today, of what has worked in the past, and may work in the future. The secrets of wealth creation are known, but not always the detailed execution of those same lessons. It is the will power needed especially after failure, or perseverance, that is core to success. Any reader will learn that he or she can be rich anywhere in today's FinTech world. 


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) This is the story of very special people in various businesses with talent that finds a way to true wealth. The pattern shows how drive and perseverance often wins the way to immense wealth, especially in tech.

2) The ability to work with "odd" co-worker friends, needs to be learned in life. Only once you start to find a balance of lifestyle and career drive, do you find out all of the new skills you need to succeed long term. 

3) This is never about somebody happy to be average or just OK. The common pattern shows that there is always a deep driver or just luck to push any rich person to a level few others ever reach.The question I still wonder is if you need to be smart in order to be in the right "lucky" place.

The author Bo Peabody knows his limits. He also knows what is needed in a variety of situations more than many get a chance to observe. If you have tried anything new and challenging, this is worth while. You will find his opinions can be re-used for restaurants or any other business as they are very deep & profitable. This book is highly recommended and very easy to read. Perfect for a few hours over a weekend or on a commute.


Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, October 20, 2017

Friday Feature Movie Review: The Big Short by Michael Lewis マネー ・ ショート マイケル・ルイス

The Big Short is surprisingly entertaining as a movie, and is over before you know it, despite 130 minutes in length. Based on a true story, this documentary style movie is a great way to review what really happened around 2008. It brings a true view to the build up before Lehman Brothers collapsed, and who within financial markets, knew there were warning signs very early in the process. It was one of the biggest trades ever, and shines a wonderful light on some of the winners from this period. The most interesting takeaway I found was the emotions of each character, and what they had to go through. The total lack of support in any negative vision. Most people did not want to hear the bad news. They wanted the positive false hopes to continue, even in the face of hard facts showing another negative wave to come.

It must be understood that nobody knew how big the collapse would have been, or what the final housing defaults were actually going to be before the pop. As Ryan Gosling, who plays Jared Vennett, says in one scene, a key Deutsche Bank trader for Credit Default Swaps, it was a tough time. He was known as "Chicken Little" who thought the sky would fall on the US housing market. He was laughed at inside the firm, and not considered a realististic player on Wall Street. The honest truth hurts most when it is not popular.

Christian Bale plays Michael Burry, the founder of Scion Capital. It was he who had the idea to short the US housing market, and asked Wall Street to help. He plays a very off beat character very realistically, especially his social inability to communicate with people normally. A trader who really needed his odd personality to believe in himself, and his clear vision, when many others felt he was very wrong and possibly mentally ill.

Steve Carell plays the founder of FrontPoint, Mark Baum, who has his own demons emotionally, yet still contains his drive towards a hugely profitable CDO trading opportunity. It is ultimately discovered from a wrong number phone call, that leads to over US$1BN+ dollars in profit for his hedge fund firm and US$200M+ in personal bonus wealth. There is nothing funny about this part, in fact painful is a better description of his portrayal on screen. He really pulls it off well in a great performance.

Last but not least is Brad Pitt, who plays a former JPMorgan trader Ben Rickert. He worked in both New York & Singapore, yet retires in Colorado. He has lost his confidence in the financial system years before the crisis, but finds his way into the heart of it again. All this only due to a chance meeting while walking his dog. He becomes friendly with 2 amazing hedge fund founders at Brownstown Capital, Charlie Geller & Jamie Shipley, who turn US$100K of savings into US$30M well before the crisis, and a lot more afterwards. 

All of the characters are very real, and very much in your face. Nobody is trying to be anything they are not. They are all in many ways, a cast of human oddities who get a chance to see the world crash well before the event, and benefit from it enormously. This is a drama with comedic moments, but do not assume every man on the street will follow it easily. They take a very dry subject and make it entertaining, but a financial background would certainly help to follow the plot. 

The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) There is no limit to being too careful with your beliefs on investment opportunities. Ethics and counter trends are a true test of any financial firm long term.

2) Reputation can be a weapon, but can also be a weakness. Conviction in any single trade needs to be rock solid the more radical is seems to others in the same market.

3) The long history and legacy of original thinkers making a fortune. George Soros, is one of many examples of top-tier risk takers seeing a chance and going "all in".

I must add though, that unlike the tech boom and bust of 2001, more people felt the pain from the many lost homes. They do not really enjoy being right as they know that it only can mean that millions of people will then suffer as a result. It was a sobering thought, but still a great movie to enjoy. It is the details of these characters that make the movie. The bigger picture is assumed, and does not take away any enjoyment from this film. Highly recommended, but more appealing for those in finance!

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com